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How to prepare and cook coypu?

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default How to prepare and cook coypu?

Post by BertieFox on 4th January 2011, 1:38 pm

A recurring pest where we live are coypu, locally known as 'ragondins'. They look so much like large rats that it is a bit discouraging to consider eating them.
I hate killing things and just burying the bodies, but has anybody on this forum actual experience in preparing and cooking them?
The French are reputed to make them into pate, but as they often carry Weil's disease and other nasties, I am a bit reluctant to do so.
Starting soon, they will be trapped anyway and shot, and I'd like to give eating them a try.
Any suggestions?
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default Re: How to prepare and cook coypu?

Post by Guest on 4th January 2011, 1:55 pm

Nutria (Myocastor coypus) for our American friends.

We have fed them to dogs. The meat is reported to be very strong flavoured. Wood Troll says there is more meat on them a rabbit.... but being vegetarians that as far as we go!

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Post by mr_sfstk8d on 4th January 2011, 2:12 pm

I guess you'd treat is as any other rodent: rabbit, squirrel, beaver, etc. Not a lot of meat, but lean and gamey.

Cook it a long time.

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Post by MrsC on 4th January 2011, 3:53 pm

I bet Billy will have a few thoughts on this one. Over to you Mr R...

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Post by Compostwoman on 4th January 2011, 6:27 pm

Compostman has eaten Coypu and says it was basically cooked like rabbit. A bit stronger tasting but apart from that, rabbit like for treatment.

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Post by Mike on 6th January 2011, 2:03 pm

BertieFox wrote:A recurring pest where we live are coypu.......Starting soon, they will be trapped anyway and shot, and I'd like to give eating them a try. Any suggestions?



This surpises me. Where are you living that these "water rats" thrive well enough to be pests? Here in the US feral populations from escaped nutria mainly confined to the South. But perhaps this is bacause you lack our native "muskrats" (which out compete nutria in the North but not in the South).

Don't just bury them. Maybe not for eating, but you'd at least want to skin them and process the fur. That's where the feral escapees came from, attempts to popularize nutria fur for "working class mink". Something nicer than muskrat fur.

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Post by GB on 14th January 2011, 12:54 am

I have seen it cooked on telly and it looked really good! Its a really hefty not so small animal and Mike, they are destroying large parts of Europe with their digging and rooting and having NO preditors.

Treat like you would rabbit or if you are afraid of its being too strong (like old wild rabbits can be for some people) just par-boil it until tender. Then fry or caseroll or what ever you want to do with it. It was a stew I saw made.

They are down here in Florida but have only seen a few signs of them, never the animal itself. Pity about that as I'm always up for a new meat Very Happy

Oh, I think it has oil glands that have to be cut out, will check up on that for you.

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Post by GB on 14th January 2011, 1:59 pm

This first bit is about a cousin of the nutria (capybara) but should work for them too................

The traditional way of processing of capybara meat in the Colombian and Venezuelan llanos is to salt and dry it. The carcass is first skinned and then all meat is separated from the skeleton in one piece, washed thoroughly to eliminate the blood, drained and then abundantly covered with coarse salt. The fresh boneless meat is folded in a pile for about 12 hours and then hung to dry on poles in the sun. Often, at the very end of the drying process the meat is laid out to sun-dry on the savannah vegetation. Once the process is completed, the remaining subcutaneous fat and haematomas are removed with a spoon, leaving the final product ready for transport to market. The entire process takes from 10 to 15 days. The final product (the slab) is whitish in colour, much like salted cod. The fresh slab represents some 39 percent of the live weight and the dried slab about 17 percent, with a proportionately larger yield for larger animals.

And I found this on nutria/coypu..............

Coypu meat is tasty and is consumed in many regions of South America as well as in parts of Europe. Because of the absence of musk glands, the meat is free of the "gamy" flavor found in squirrels and rabbits. It is moist, fine "rained, medium light in color, and firm. It is one of the mildest and tenderest of wild meats.

Dont know if its any help but with that review I would eat em Wink

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Post by GB on 14th January 2011, 2:19 pm

Grooming is done by scratching and "nibbling" the fur, and an oily secretion from glands located near the mouth and anus lubricates the pelage. Secretions from the anal glands are also employed for marking out territory.

So would deff. cut those out before eating!


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Post by Mike on 14th January 2011, 3:32 pm

GB wrote:This first bit is about a cousin of the nutria (capybara) but should work for them too................

The traditional way of processing of capybara meat .....

Well yes, relatives. But that's like saying a woodchuck is like a squirrel. Wioodchucks are the largest member of the squirrel family but they don't eat like squirrels, don't live like squirrels, and I don't think you'd prepare them the same way.

Capybara are the largest rodents still around. About the size of the smallest wild pigs. I think they are grazing animals. Definitely not eating the same things as nutria so I wouldn't expect them to taste at all similar.

And yes, as GB has pointed out, escaped nutria are indded a pest in the deep south of the US. But that is precisely why I thought it odd that they were a problem in Europe since they aren't invasive once you move north in the US. But this might be the result of the native "muskrat" out competing them in the North.

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